Designing The Parts V – AT24C64

Designing The Parts V – AT24C64

Following the same way that we did with the previous articles, we now have to design the component AT24C64, which is an EEPROM memory. This time, I didn’t find any component like that on Sparkfun’s or Adafruit’s library. This time you really might need to draw the component!

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Designing The Parts IV – PCF8563

Designing The Parts IV – PCF8563

Following the same way that we did with the previous articles, we now have to design the component PCF8563, which is a real-time clock module. This time, I didn’t find any component like that on Sparkfun’s or Adafruit’s library. This time you really might need to draw the component!

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IoT WiFi DIY motion detector with e-mail notification using PIR sensor and ESP8266

In this project I am using the ESP8266 WiFi module and PIR sensor motion detector to get e-mail alerts if someone enters the room while I am away. I am using GadgetKeeper Cloud Platform to bring e-mail notifications with PIR Sensor. I have choose GadgetKeeper Cloud Platform because it’s FREE and easy to use. The whole project costed me around $7 and was pretty easy to build.

Step 1: Parts

  • 1× esp8266-07 – Ebay;
  • 1× PIR Sensor – Ebay;
  • 1x Bread Board Power Supply – Ebay;
  • 1x 12V AC-DC Power Adaptor – Ebay;
  • 2x 400pin Breadboard – Ebay;
  • Wires.

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Arduino Power-down Mode With Accelerometer, Compass and Pressure Sensor

Arduino Power-down Mode With Accelerometer, Compass and Pressure Sensor

Introduction

Last article, I wrote about how to use our own homemade Arduino Pro Mini bare bones along with an OLED display and how to make both of them consume as little power as possible. In fact, we managed to achieve a small 1.1 uA current with both of them sleeping. Also in our circuit there were a PCF8563 real-time clock module and one AT24C64 EEPROM memory. Now, to proceed with our smartwatch project we need to add sensors, such as an accelerometer, compass and pressure sensor. This article is about how to add them, read the variables and keep saving power.

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OLED Display and Arduino With Power-Save Mode

OLED Display and Arduino With Power-Save Mode

On the previous article I wrote about how to use the real-time clock module with the EEPROM non-volatile memory. Now it is time to get something working that resembles a watch. Make something that matters. How about adding a display? Last post it was possible to achieve a power consumption of only 16 uA (improved) 0.7uA on the smartwatch prototype. Now we can see how much power the watch will consume. In this case, it is an application that needs to consume the smallest current possible but also needs a display, then one can use a OLED display, which is the abbreviation of “Organic Light-Emitting Diode”, which is a much more economic display in terms of current than the regular LED displays. An overview about OLEDs, first.

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The Bootloader With Arduino Uno For The Atmega328P-PU

Introduction

A bootloader is a code that is executed before an Operating System, or in the case of an Arduino, before your program starts to run. The concept of bootloaders is universal to virtually all electronics such as laptops, smartphones, and other devices. A bootloader package the instructions to boot the system kernel and most of them have their own debugging or modification environment. As the bootloader runs before any piece of software on your device, it makes it extremely processor specific and every Arduino chip has its own bootloader. Many makers out there will never need to change or program their Arduino’s bootloader. Some, however, will be forced to do this.

One reason to program the bootloader might be that, when using the device, the user did something wrong that damaged it. Perhaps the company forgot to program it at factory level, or perhaps the user burned the Atmega.

Another reason to do this is if the user needs to set different fues. They are essentially configuration parameters, or like the chip’s BIOS. They control functions like which oscillator to use, and what speed to run at (i.e. the internal 8MHz oscillator, or an external crystal), brownout detection, and the size of the flash.

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Adding EEPROM to your Arduino Pro Mini Smartwatch

Adding EEPROM to your Arduino Pro Mini Smartwatch

Introduction

There are numerous EEPROM memories, but one I used was the AT24C64 from Atmel. Atmel is the same company behind the Atmega 328p which is the brain of the Arduino Pro Mini. You would be surprised to see how they interact with people/makers/consumers on Twitter and Google Plus. This memory is non-volatile, which means it wont lose its data went our watch, or your device runs out of power.

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How to make an Arduino Pro Mini bare bones with Real-time Clock

How to make an Arduino Pro Mini bare bones with Real-time Clock

Recapitulation

One thing I didn’t find clearly over the internet is how to make an Arduino Pro Mini bare bones, that is, from the scratch, and how to make one on the breadboard. This is really useful if you want to make a custom pcb/smd circuit, because you will be able to test your hardware ans software before sending the schematics and the layout of the board to the manufacturer. Also, it will make your circuit Arduino compatible. If you read my previous article, here, I showed how to make a simple circuit with the PCF8563 real-time clock, reading and writing it. Now it is time to put your Atmega 328p on the breadboard and complete a simple read of the clock, maintaining the power consumption low, and for that I will use the LowPower library.

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